Česky

Military University Hospital Prague – the pavilion of the Military Institute of Forensic Medicine and of Pathology (2015)

The pavilion of the Military University Hospital in Prague was designed to complement older building E. The new four-floor building is lower than the neighboring building and it thus makes a transitional element between the hospital and houses of the Radimova Street.

The Pavilion is utilized by two separate departments, the department of pathology, and the Military Institute of Forensic Medicine. The object houses lecture rooms, autopsy rooms and laboratories, mortuary cooling rooms, police identification room, libraries, as well as medical rooms. The technical rooms were located into the ground-floor which is interconnected with the rest of the hospital. The purposes of the individual places are relevant to their technical equipment; the air conditioning is customized for each room type individually. Movement of persons within the entire pavilion, as well as the building entrance, is barrier free.

The reinforced concrete monolithic skeleton of the building has a bricked, light building envelope with thermal insulation, infilling and complement constructions are in  grey. The simplicity of the outer part of the building contrasts with the interior, in which several shades of one color are involved. The entire object with two elevators is barrierfree, and it thus offers persons with limited mobility corresponding, available background including a restricted car park.

Due to the number of civil engineering networks and their protective zones, we could not plant any trees in the surrounding of the building. Therefore, we chose evergreen shrubs such as cotoneaster salificolius, groundcover roses, or golden princess (or spiraea japonica), and higher bushes such as hamamelis intermedia blooming from January to March. In the rest of the area, we started a new lawn. The Pavilion thus got incorporated among the houses and other hospital buildings, as well as into the surrounding countryside.

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